Everything to know about Acer Chromebook Tab 10, the first-ever Google Chrome OS tablet

Android tablets aren’t really in demand anymore due to the rise of phablets, and dating back to last year when rumors of Andromeda were in the air, many have wondered if Google’s web-based Chrome OS would replace Android as Google’s primary software for large touch screen devices. That could very well be the plan despite few wanting to keep Android tablets around (we’re looking at you Sony and Huawei). Demand has surely slowed for tablets, but the lack of good options is part of the reason why. Android tablets in general just aren’t that great, and so earlier this week, Google with help from Acer unfolded the first-ever Chrome OS tablet.

Acer Chromebook Tab 10 is the first Chrome OS tablet and it’s geared towards educational and productivity use. Please note that this is not an Android Chrome OS hybrid, it runs the lightweight Chrome OS exclusively, the same version on modern-day laptop computers only designed for being touchscreen. As a side note, the product was announced on the same day as Apple’s Education event. Chromebooks have traditionally outpaced Apple iPads in K-12 schools, and to meet a new attempt by Apple to take ground from Google so it seems, the search giant and its partner have come out with a tablet of their own in Acer Chromebook Tab 10 to compete on this floor. Google is more serious about education than anyone else, but a shift from computers to tablets may prove not the best move. Perhaps down the road, Google will adjust Chrome OS with future updates to operate better on touch-screen devices as opposed to ones with a full keyboard.

Chromebooks other than Pixelbook in general are geared toward education, and it seems as if Chrome OS tablets will serve the same purpose. We don’t yet know if Chrome OS tablets will become the trend and replacement of Android tablets many expected since as of right now there’s only one model. However, the OS is open source so theoretically, OEMs can make their own. I guess we’ll find out eventually.

We’re acting as if this is something groundbreaking, I know. The device itself really is not, it’s just the potential and possible shift in times that we’re excited about. As for the Acer Chromebook Tab 10’s design, it’s super lightweight and portable. Since it’ll be in a lot of classrooms, the whole teacher-admin function is present, and students can still enjoy a personalized experience through native apps and now Android applications. This addition is a big deal.

Some of Google’s more popular Chrome OS apps include Google Classroom, Adobe Illustrator Draw, WeVideo, and a writable PDF app called Squid. Squid can help students utilize an included stylus that comes with the new Chromebook Tab 10. Google is also training up the next-generation of software developers by boarding a fun and easy to learn from coding app known as Scratch Jr. I think we heard about this or something similar at a past Google I/O event, but there’s bound to be an update coming.

Some of the included specs are USB Type-C charging, dual speakers, Wi-Fi, a 2MP webcam, and a 9.7-inch QXGA IPS display with a 2048 × 1536 resolution. There’s also a 5MP rear shooter, the first for any Chrome OS powered device since this is a tablet, and after all, most tablets have front and back cameras. The slate uses an uncommon OP1 processor with 4GB of RAM and Google says it will have great battery life too. There will be 32GB of storage inside (with microSD expansion), a headphone jack, and Bluetooth for connecting wireless devices.

The Chromebook Tab 10 by Acer will be available this coming Spring with a price of $329. This will fall right in line with other Chromebooks, and seems like a solid price to me. Whether you are a student or simply want to have an interesting piece of Google hardware that could shape the future, this tablet is for you. With Google I/O 2018 happening in just over a month’s time, we’re not far away from learning more about the search giant’s plans and getting answers to our questions. Let us know any thoughts down in the comment section. There’s obviously a lot to think about.

*The picture above is not the Acer Chromebook Tab 10.

SOURCE [Google Keyword]

About Antonio Imperial 9 Articles
My name is Antonio Imperial, but you can call me Tony. I've been using Android phones since the Gingerbread days (yup, my first phone was a rebranded Micromax phone from a local Filipino brand) and currently, I'm using the Freetel Musashi as my daily driver. I'm a OnePlus, Oukitel or Zuk guy more than a Samsung guy.